Technical Library: cleaning (Page 1 of 41)

Higher Defluxing Temperature and Low Standoff Component Cleaning - A Connection?

Technical Library | 2020-11-04 17:49:45.0

OEMs and CMs designing and building electronic assemblies for high reliability applications are typically faced with a decision to clean or not to clean the assembly. If ionic residues remain on the substrate surface, potential failure mechanisms, including dendritic growth by electrochemical migration reaction and leakage current, may result. These failures have been well documented. If a decision to clean substrates is made, there are numerous cleaning process options available. For defluxing applications, the most common systems are spray-in-air, employing either batch or inline cleaning equipment and an engineered aqueous based cleaning agent. Regardless of the type of cleaning process adopted, effective cleaning of post solder residue requires chemical, thermal and mechanical energies. The chemical energy is derived from the engineered cleaning agent; the thermal energy from the increased temperature of the cleaning agent, and the mechanical energy from the pump system employed within the cleaning equipment. The pump system, which includes spray pressure, spray bar configuration and nozzle selection, is optimized for the specific process to create an efficient cleaning system. As board density has increased and component standoff heights have decreased, cleaning processes are steadily challenged. Over time, cleaning agent formulations have advanced to match new solder paste developments, spray system configurations have improved, and wash temperatures (thermal energy) have been limited to a maximum of 160ºF. In most cases, this is due to thermal limitations of the materials used to build the polymer-based cleaning equipment. Building equipment out of stainless steel is an option, but one that may be cost prohibitive. Given the maximum allowable wash temperature, difficult cleaning applications are met by increasing the wash exposure time; including reducing the conveyor speed of inline cleaners or extending wash time in batch cleaners. Although this yields effective cleaning results, process productivity may be compromised. However, high temperature resistant polymer materials, capable of withstanding a 180°F wash temperature, are now available and can be used in cleaning equipment builds. For this study, the authors explored the potential for increasing cleaning process efficiency as a result of an increase in thermal energy due to the use of higher wash temperature. The cleaning equipment selected was an inline cleaner built with high temperature resistant polymer material. For the analysis, standard substrates were used. These were populated with numerous low standoff chip cap components and soldered with both no-clean tin-lead and lead-free solder pastes. Two aqueous based cleaning agents were selected, and multiple wash temperatures and wash exposure times were evaluated. Cleanliness assessments were made through visual analysis of under-component inspection, as well as localized extraction and Ion Chromatography in accordance with current IPC standards.

ZESTRON Americas

Thermal Residue Fingerprinting: A Revolutionary Approach to Develop a Selective Cleaning Solution

Technical Library | 2009-07-01 09:24:25.0

During the last 5 years, the processes to remove flux residues especially for lead-free and challenging geometries have demonstrated new cleaning obstacles which have to be overcome.i A new methodology has been recently developed to further increase the propensity for successful cleaning.ii At the core of this method is the thermal identification of the residue matrix. Thermal energy changes the physical state, i.e. transitions between liquid, solid and gas phases. By taking advantage of such specific information during phase transitions, the cleaning process can be tailored to such settings, which in turn increases the cleaning success significantly.

ZESTRON Americas

Back to Basics – Why Clean?

Technical Library | 2011-06-28 16:10:29.0

ZESTRON America’s spring edition of ZESTRON News goes back to basics providing the latest information on the topics of cleaning in the electronics manufacturing industry.

ZESTRON Americas

Why Switch From Pure DI-Water to Chemistry

Technical Library | 2009-12-22 21:47:08.0

While most cleaning applications in the North American market rely on cleaning with DI-water only, for removing OA fluxes in first place, recent market studies show that water has reached its limitations in cleaning performance while favoring usage of aqueous processes. The term aqueous implies the use of aqueous-based chemistries with active ingredients and are usually diluted with DI-water. The nature of these active ingredients in the aqueous chemistries varies between manufacturer and his R&D knowledge.

ZESTRON Americas

Fluid Flow Mechanics Key To Low Standoff Cleaning

Technical Library | 2009-09-18 14:42:37.0

In recent years, various studies have been issued on cleaning under low standoff components; most however, with incomplete information. It is essential to revisit and describe the latest challenges in the market, identifying obvious gaps in available information. Such information is crucial for potential and existing users to fully address the cleanliness levels under their respective components. With the emergence of lead-free soldering and even smaller components, new challenges have arisen including cleaning in gaps of less than 1-mil.

ZESTRON Americas

Cleaning High-power Electronics

Technical Library | 2009-01-06 00:06:30.0

To prevent malfunctions in high-power electronics, flux residues must be removed from flip chip components prior to subsequent processes. As a result, integrating a suitable cleaning application into the manufacturing process of flip chip components is often required. Solvent based applications have re-emerged, and with that, an overall process solution is necessary.

ZESTRON Americas

Utility of Dual Applicators for Non-Atomized Conformal Coating to Improve High-Volume Manufacturing Optimization

Technical Library | 2017-12-07 10:35:50.0

Electronics manufacturers protect their circuit boards with conformal coatings. Conformal coatings serve as a barrier from environmental hazards and internal shorts, tin whiskers, and corrosion at the board level. Within conformal coatings different material chemistries specialize in shielding from an array of hazards and can be applied by multiple methods. The most common method is atomized spray which disperses the material into a fine mist. Alternatively, non-atomized coating controls the materials' dispense shape while maintaining the original liquid form. While some applications demand atomized spray and other scenarios overlap between atomized and non-atomized coating, this paper focuses on the circumstances where materials are ideally suited for non-atomized, selective coating.

Nordson ASYMTEK

Conformal Coating Process Characterization Considerations

Technical Library | 2013-09-25 20:57:24.0

Conformal coating is an enabling process that allows for the ruggedizing of electronic devices and modules. As the process increases the durability of electronics that are subjected to various end-use environmental conditions, it adds value to the product. While it does add value, consumers and manufacturers expect the electronics to work when subjected to dirt, humidity, moisture, corrosive materials, and various other contaminants. This expectation results in a drive to minimize the cost of the process. The lowest cost of ownership for a conformal coating process occurs by utilizing automated selective conformal coating equipment.

Nordson ASYMTEK

SMT007-MIRTEC Intelligent Factory Automation Article-November 2020

Technical Library | 2020-12-02 20:36:54.0

Industry 4.0 is a topic of much discussion within the electronics manufacturing industry. Manufacturers and vendors are trying to come to terms with what that means. In the most simplistic of terms, Industry 4.0 is a trend toward automation and data exchange within the manufacturing process. This basically requires connectivity and communication from machine to machine within the manufacturing line. The challenge is to collect data from each of the systems within the line and make that data available to the rest of the machines. Without test and inspection, there is no Industry 4.0. The whole purpose of test and inspection is to collect actionable data that may be used to reduce defects and maximize efficiency within the manufacturing line. The goal is to minimize scrap and get a really good handle on those process parameters that need to be put in place to manufacture products the right way the first time. For maximum efficiency, three inspection systems are required within the production line. These are solder paste inspection (SPI) post-solder deposition, automated optical inspection (AOI) post-placement, and AOI post-reflow. This requires a substantial investment; however, the combination of all three inspection machines is really the only true way to provide feedback for each stage of the manufacturing process.

MIRTEC Corp

Conductive Adhesive Dispensing, Process Considerations

Technical Library | 1999-08-27 09:24:56.0

Dispensing conductive adhesives in an automated factory environment creates some special challenges. A robust production process starts with understanding the adhesives in their fluid state and which important parameters must be controlled. Developing this understanding requires experience with a large number of materials and valves over time. Common uses of conductive adhesives in surface mount applications, die attach applications, and gasketing are addressed. As vendors of dispensing equipment, the authors see a constant stream of such applications. Dispensing requirements, techniques, and equipment resulting from this experience are discussed. Guidelines for optimizing quality and speed are given.

Nordson ASYMTEK

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