Technical Library: distributer (Page 1 of 34)

Making Sense of Accuracy, Repeatability and Specification for Automated Fluid Dispensing Systems

Technical Library | 2013-11-14 10:43:40.0

Understanding accuracy and repeatability is an important step to analyze fluid dispensing system performance. They can also be prone to misinterpretation when reviewing a product specification. A dispensing motion system can be made to perform better or worse under different operating conditions. This article will explain accuracy and repeatability, and how they can be applied to different specifications. It will also discuss key considerations when interpreting accuracy and repeatability for decision making.

Nordson ASYMTEK

Fluid Flow Mechanics Key To Low Standoff Cleaning

Technical Library | 2009-09-18 14:42:37.0

In recent years, various studies have been issued on cleaning under low standoff components; most however, with incomplete information. It is essential to revisit and describe the latest challenges in the market, identifying obvious gaps in available information. Such information is crucial for potential and existing users to fully address the cleanliness levels under their respective components. With the emergence of lead-free soldering and even smaller components, new challenges have arisen including cleaning in gaps of less than 1-mil.

ZESTRON Americas

Higher Defluxing Temperature and Low Standoff Component Cleaning - A Connection?

Technical Library | 2020-11-04 17:49:45.0

OEMs and CMs designing and building electronic assemblies for high reliability applications are typically faced with a decision to clean or not to clean the assembly. If ionic residues remain on the substrate surface, potential failure mechanisms, including dendritic growth by electrochemical migration reaction and leakage current, may result. These failures have been well documented. If a decision to clean substrates is made, there are numerous cleaning process options available. For defluxing applications, the most common systems are spray-in-air, employing either batch or inline cleaning equipment and an engineered aqueous based cleaning agent. Regardless of the type of cleaning process adopted, effective cleaning of post solder residue requires chemical, thermal and mechanical energies. The chemical energy is derived from the engineered cleaning agent; the thermal energy from the increased temperature of the cleaning agent, and the mechanical energy from the pump system employed within the cleaning equipment. The pump system, which includes spray pressure, spray bar configuration and nozzle selection, is optimized for the specific process to create an efficient cleaning system. As board density has increased and component standoff heights have decreased, cleaning processes are steadily challenged. Over time, cleaning agent formulations have advanced to match new solder paste developments, spray system configurations have improved, and wash temperatures (thermal energy) have been limited to a maximum of 160ºF. In most cases, this is due to thermal limitations of the materials used to build the polymer-based cleaning equipment. Building equipment out of stainless steel is an option, but one that may be cost prohibitive. Given the maximum allowable wash temperature, difficult cleaning applications are met by increasing the wash exposure time; including reducing the conveyor speed of inline cleaners or extending wash time in batch cleaners. Although this yields effective cleaning results, process productivity may be compromised. However, high temperature resistant polymer materials, capable of withstanding a 180°F wash temperature, are now available and can be used in cleaning equipment builds. For this study, the authors explored the potential for increasing cleaning process efficiency as a result of an increase in thermal energy due to the use of higher wash temperature. The cleaning equipment selected was an inline cleaner built with high temperature resistant polymer material. For the analysis, standard substrates were used. These were populated with numerous low standoff chip cap components and soldered with both no-clean tin-lead and lead-free solder pastes. Two aqueous based cleaning agents were selected, and multiple wash temperatures and wash exposure times were evaluated. Cleanliness assessments were made through visual analysis of under-component inspection, as well as localized extraction and Ion Chromatography in accordance with current IPC standards.

ZESTRON Americas

Conductive Adhesive Dispensing, Process Considerations

Technical Library | 1999-08-27 09:24:56.0

Dispensing conductive adhesives in an automated factory environment creates some special challenges. A robust production process starts with understanding the adhesives in their fluid state and which important parameters must be controlled. Developing this understanding requires experience with a large number of materials and valves over time. Common uses of conductive adhesives in surface mount applications, die attach applications, and gasketing are addressed. As vendors of dispensing equipment, the authors see a constant stream of such applications. Dispensing requirements, techniques, and equipment resulting from this experience are discussed. Guidelines for optimizing quality and speed are given.

Nordson ASYMTEK

Considerations in Dispensing Conformal Coatings

Technical Library | 1999-08-27 09:27:10.0

Conformal coating is a material that is applied to electronic products or assemblies to protect them from solvents, moisture, dust or other contaminants that may cause harm. Coating also prevents dendrite growth, which may result in product failure. This paper will discuss the variables that affect the application of conformal coatings, and review in detail those variables that impact the process of selective coating of printed circuit boards.

Nordson ASYMTEK

Reflow Soldering Processes and Troubleshooting: SMT, BGA, CSP and Flip Chip Technologies

Technical Library | 2021-01-03 19:24:52.0

Reflow soldering is the primary method for interconnecting surface mount technology (SMT) applications. Successful implementation of this process depends on whether a low defect rate can be achieved. In general, defects often can be attributed to causes rooted in all three aspects, including materials, processes, and designs. Troubleshooting of reflow soldering requires identification and elimination of root causes. Where correcting these causes may be beyond the reach of manufacturers, further optimizing the other relevant factors becomes the next best option in order to minimize the defect rate.

SMTnet

Hand Soldering, Electrical Overstress, and Electrostatic Discharge

Technical Library | 1999-05-09 13:07:16.0

This paper will give the reader a general understanding of EOS and ESD phenomena. It specifically addresses hand soldering's role in EOS and ESD and how to protect against and test for potential problems. It discusses how Metcal Systems address EOS and ESD concerns and how they differ from conventional soldering systems.

Metcal

Rework Challenges for Smart Phones and Tablets

Technical Library | 2015-04-23 18:48:18.0

Smart phones are complex, costly devices and therefore need to be reworked correctly the first time. In order to meet the ever-growing demand for performance, the complexity of mobile devices has increased immensely, with more than a 70% greater number of packages now found inside of them than just a few years ago. For instance, 1080P HD camera and video capabilities are now available on most high end smart phones or tablet computers, making their production more elaborate and expensive. The printed circuit boards for these devices are no longer considered disposable goods, and their bill of materials start from $150.00, with higher end smart phones going up to $238.00, and tablets well over $300.00.

Metcal

Virtual Manufacturing

Technical Library | 2019-09-16 09:41:02.0

“What is Virtual Manufacturing?” The simplest answer is a manufacturing simulation using a computer. The more complete answer is that virtual manufacturing is the process of designing a model of a real system and conducting experiments with this model for the purpose of understanding the behavior of the system. In today’s complex manufacturing environment, processes must be completely understood before implementation in order to “get it right the first time.” To achieve this goal, the use of a virtual environment is essential for simulating individual manufacturing processes and the total manufacturing system. By driving compatibility between the product design and the assembly plant process, these virtual tools enable the early optimization of cost, quality, and time to help achieve integrated products, process and resource design, and affordability.

ACI Technologies, Inc.

Investigation of PCB Failure after SMT Manufacturing Process

Technical Library | 2019-10-21 09:58:50.0

An ACI Technologies customer inquired regarding printed circuit board(PCB) failures that were becoming increasingly prevalent after the SMT (surface mount technology) manufacturing process. The failures were detected by electrical testing, but were undetermined as to the location and specific devices causing the failures. The failures were suspected to be caused predominately in the BGA (ball grid array) devices located on specific sites on this 16 layer construction. Information that was provided on the nature of the failures (i.e., opens or shorts) included high resistance shorts that were occurring in those specified areas. The surface finish was a eutectic HASL (hot air solder leveling) and the solder paste used was a water soluble Sn/Pb(tin/lead).

ACI Technologies, Inc.

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