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To Quantify a Wetting Balance Curve

Technical Library | 2017-10-19 01:17:56.0

Wetting balance testing has been an industry standard for evaluating the solderability of surface finishes on printed circuit boards (PCB) for many years. A Wetting Balance Curve showing Force as a function of Time, along with the individual data outputs "Time to Zero" T(0), "Time to Two-Thirds Maximum Force" T(2/3), and "Maximum Force" F(max) are usually used to evaluate the solderability performance of various surface finishes. While a visual interpretation of the full curve is a quick way to compare various test results, this method is subjective and does not lend itself readily to a rigorous statistical evaluation. Therefore, very often, when a statistical evaluation is desired for comparing the solderability between different surface finishes or different test conditions, one of the individual parameters is chosen for convenience. However, focusing on a single output usually doesn't provide a complete picture of the solderability of the surface finish being evaluated.In this paper, various models here-in labeled as "point" and "area" models are generated using the three most commonly evaluated individual outputs T(0), T(2/3), and F(max). These models have been studied to quantify how well each describes the full wetting balance curve. The solderability score (S-Score) with ranking from 0 to 10 were given to quantify the wetting balance curve as the result of the model study, which corresponds well with experimental results.

Enthone

Counterfeit Integrated Circuits: Detection, Avoidance, and the Challenges Ahead.

Technical Library | 2014-09-04 17:43:19.0

The counterfeiting of electronic components has become a major challenge in the 21st century. The electronic component supply chain has been greatly affected by widespread counterfeit incidents. A specialized service of testing, detection, and avoidance must be created to tackle the worldwide outbreak of counterfeit integrated circuits (ICs). So far, there are standards and programs in place for outlining the testing, documenting, and reporting procedures. However, there is not yet enough research addressing the detection and avoidance of such counterfeit parts. In this paper we will present, in detail, all types of counterfeits, the defects present in them, and their detection methods. We will then describe the challenges to implementing these test methods and to their effectiveness. We will present several anti-counterfeit measures to prevent this widespread counterfeiting, and we also consider the effectiveness and limitations of these anti-counterfeiting techniques.

Honeywell International

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