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Embracing a New Paradigm: Electronic Work Instructions (EWI)

Technical Library | 2019-03-15 16:26:50.0

While there have been quite dramatic and evident improvements in almost every facet of manufacturing over the last several decades owing to the advent and mass adoption of computer automation and networking, there is one aspect of production that remains stubbornly unaffected. Massive databases track everything from orders, to inventory, to personnel. CAD systems allow for interactive and dynamic 3D rendering and testing, digital troubleshooting, and simulation and analysis prior to mass production. Yet, with all of this computational power and all of this networking capability, one element of production has remained thoroughly and firmly planted in the past. Nearly all manufacturing or assembly procedures are created, deployed, and stored using methodologies derived from a set of assumptions that ceased to be relevant fifty years ago. This set of assumptions, referred to below as the “Paper Paradigm” has been, and continues as the dominant paradigm for manufacturing procedures to this day. It is time for a new paradigm, one that accounts for the vastly different technological landscape of this era, one that provides a simple, efficient interface, deep traceability, and dynamic response to rapidly changing economic forces.This paper seeks to present an alternative. Instead of enhancing and improving on systems that became irrelevant with the invention of a database, instead of propping up an outdated, outmoded and inefficient system with incremental improvements; rewrite the paradigm. Change the underlying assertions to more accurately reflect our current technological capability. Instead of relying on evolutionary improvements, it is time for a revolution in manufacturing instructions.

ScanCAD International, Inc.

Lean Kitting: A Case Study

Technical Library | 2008-08-20 17:28:19.0

Kitting is the first step in printed circuit board assembly. It is initiated well in advance of the actual production start to be able to prepare and deliver the kit on time. Kitting involves the gathering of all the parts needed for a particular assembly from the stockroom and issuing the kit to the manufacturing line at the right time and in the right quantity. This paper discusses kitting, describes ways to eliminate waste in different phases of kitting, and illustrates lean kitting using a case study conducted in a major contract manufacturer site.

Optimal Electronics Corporation

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