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Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix

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#79445

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 11 December, 2017

Some pick and place machine manufacturers offer dual lane feeders which may double the machine's feeder capacity. What are the pros/cons of using dual lane feeders in a high mix environment? Are they just for 8mm? Thanks!

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#79446

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 11 December, 2017

That's not really the point of dual lane feeders. As a general rule having a dual lane 8mm feeder means the machines "slots" are actually 16mm, dual lanes on a 8mm feeder helps keep the overall lane density of a machine higher, its much easier to build a rugged dual lane feeder than two single lane ones. It's easy to be distracted by "lane counts/slots" quoted for a machine (usually just a number representing ow many 8mm reels it can hold), it means very little unless you know how many of the "slots" each feeder size uses, and how many you might want, it is not always what you might expect. I don't think double (or triple on ASM??) has any kind of adverse affect on your setup for a high mix environment. You might argue that much larger capacity trolleys/magazines make it more likely the parts you kit end up scattered around the machine in sub-optimal positions after extended runs. However that is as much a problem for proper job planning as anything else. Mycronic & Europlacer both heavily focus on high mix, both have feeders trolleys/mags that have lots of lanes on them. Both work on the idea that in high mix you basically leave as much stuff on the machine or at least in the feeder element as possible. How much sense that makes depends a bit on if you or customer typically kits the parts

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#79447

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 12 December, 2017

I would stay away from dual line feeders. They make change overs hell. Each new board need much more time to re-locate the components on the feeders as you need to re-load them again instead to just move the feeder with loaded reel on new position. I have no idea whoever decided that this is good idea, but obviously is someone who never has to operate with machine.

TL'DR: Dual lane feeder are totally stupid idea.

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#79450

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 12 December, 2017

Single feeders will always be your top choice. Any kind of package feeders will create issues in future. I used to have them in 10s, 8ths, 6es, 3s, 2s and the more they are the worst.

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dwl

#79451

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 12 December, 2017

A lot of it depends on what machines you are using and how well they implement dual lane feeders. A few general comparisons:

Pros: -You can fit more feeders on your machines. -One dual lane feeder is cheaper than two single lane feeders

Cons: -two reels are tied up on one feeder, so there is an extra logistical factor in optimizing change overs.

Dual lane is mostly limited to 8mm feeders.

I used Dual lane feeders in a low volume/High mix environment and they worked fine. The key is to properly optimize jobs so parts common between builds don't need to be moved or unloaded from the feeder.

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#79452

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 12 December, 2017

A pattern emerges, but really I think it means plan/optimise for your day/week not a single job. Our machine uses 10's, this means there's a significant chunk of the feeder that is not easily accessible if something like a brass shim gets stuck or flimsy plastic tape folds itself up inside the feeder. This kind of issue doesn't exist with many single or dual feeders as the mechanisms are pretty exposed. In 10's there are some significant cost advantages - perhaps 1/2 the cost of single 'gun' feeders and the feeder density is quite high, enough so that reels no longer fit next to each other in the feeder bank and instead are raked in 5's one above the other.

However even with planning by the time you have 10 lanes in every bank you basically can't optimise after a number of jobs as the "common" parts will have changed and become scattered across the bay. At that point there's a good chance you end up stripping them all and starting again but this does depend a bit on just how many feeders you own and how large your line is.

MyCronic€placer blur the lines with theirs by essentially splitting the feeder in two, the mechanical half is a large bank and the tape holding half you can move wherever you need it for optimal placement.

And lastly of course there's the question of how much difference the feeder location makes for your machine in the first place. A head mounted component camera/laser is affected far less by the distance from feeder to PCB. Arguably with high-mix headline placement speed isn't a primary concern anyway.

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#79456

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 13 December, 2017

"Pros: -You can fit more feeders on your machines. -One dual lane feeder is cheaper than two single lane feeders"

none of these is true for Sony SI-G200 machines we have

dual lane feeders are bigger than the standard 8 mm feeders so no space saving at all - you have to place two 8mm tapes next to each other and in the same distance with the other feeders' tapes so the head optimizing algorithm do not play with different steps between the feeders

one dual lane feeder cost x4 times the price of single feeder from other vendor

"The key is to properly optimize jobs so parts common between builds don't need to be moved or unloaded from the feeder."

This would never happen with high speed shooter, where each saved second makes great impact on the production. The optimizer always place the components to optimize the path of the head and components on one dual lane feeder are never at the same position for different boards, which leads to total re-loading of all feeders with each job changeover.

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#79461

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 13 December, 2017

Another aspect is the maintenance and repair of the feeders. When a bank of 10 feeders goes bad, you lose 10 positions right away. Even if you have spares, now you have to move 10 parts instead of 1. Very often you will have only one bad slot, and now you have to take the whole bank out and repair. I find it inconvenient. However, if the price factor makes huge difference, for high mix low volume, you should probably go this route. Money always talks.

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dwl

#79463

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 13 December, 2017

DeanM,

What make/model of machines are you considering? As is evident by the feedback, your mileage varies greatly depending on who's' machines your using.

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#79467

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 13 December, 2017

As mentioned above, Mycronic and Europlacer seem to be designed toward high mix so would consider them but would also like to consider a more traditional machine too. Right now I have around 220 feeder slots across two machines inline. Mycronic and Europlacer aside, a traditional machine manufacturer "A" may hold 120 feeders with no dual feeder option. Machine manufacturer "B" may hold 80 single feeders but can hold 160 if dual lane feeders are used. If dual lane feeders do not work well with high mix, then I would have to buy 3 "B" machines vs. 2 "A" machines so upfront cost becomes a significant factor. Traditional machine "C" may hold 260 if dual feeders are used which might go head to head with My or Eur as a single machine solution. My gut feel though was that dual lane feeders might cause setup hassle for the reasons listed. I would expect that any intelligent feeder enabled machine would pull the correct part no matter where it is placed on the machine (not forced by the program).

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#79468

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 14 December, 2017

"I would expect that any intelligent feeder enabled machine would pull the correct part no matter where it is placed on the machine (not forced by the program)"

this is true, but you have to tradeoff the setup time vs production time per board. You either have to spend more time to setup and then to get your PCB manufactured for less time, either you can force your machine to take the parts from where they are set before and have your PCBs manufactured for more time, everything depends on what gives you less total time: changeover+production

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#79469

Dual lane vs. single lane feeders for high mix | 14 December, 2017

> "I would expect that any intelligent feeder > enabled machine would pull the correct part no > matter where it is placed on the machine (not > forced by the program)" > > this is true, but you > have to tradeoff the setup time vs production > time per board. You either have to spend more > time to setup and then to get your PCB > manufactured for less time, either you can force > your machine to take the parts from where they > are set before and have your PCBs manufactured > for more time, everything depends on what gives > you less total time: changeover+production

Hmm Well if your buying a machine today and you're not choosing "Smart" Feeders, frankly you are making a mistake. No "forcing" required and no accidentally pushing the wrong feeder in the wrong slot. Total time to build is also affected by who loads the feeders and just how many reels of any given component you have, if the operator does it all it matters a lot. If there's a separate team kitting the jobs and loading your feeder trolleys with an ample supply of both parts and feeders it matters less, and their costs might well be overhead you would carry anyway. If your requirement is already pushing the limits of what you can fit on 2 machines I would suggest you go the 3 machine route which gives you a little head room and depending on the machines you are looking at a perhaps a little more flexibility too my mixing head types (or if your feeling really swish, having changeable heads/gantries). Personally in terms of lane space the thing I resent the most is a tray holder/feeder taking up 25% of the machine but some machines have an answer to that too, e.g Europlacer IIneo can have a table of trays internally & the Hanwha tray feeder can feed from the side using no slots. When I've looked (and manufacturers often don't tell you much about their feeder options without triggering an avalanche of sales calls) it is often the case that if they offer a dual lane 8mm feeder, that is the only 8mm feeder they offer. The lane count doubles example you give I think may even simply mean Juki?

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